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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
after 9/11, thousands of people with the opposite of katrina because fema had control. giving up on individuals helping neighbors, local government, that is a serious problem and why we are bankrupt. all the money that will go out, there is no money in the paint and -- bank so they will just borrow and print and centralize the power to be in washington dc part of that is bureaucratic and insufficient. john: thank you for all you have done to wake people up. but i fear we will not have much convince -- succe convincing people we don't need fema. even though government fails part instinct leads us to assume washington has the best. they don't. they fail all the time. fema fails constantly. after hurricane hugo one senator called it bureaucratic jackasses to get the hell out of the way. they said prove it but after hurricane andrew even in your times reported it is unclear who was in charge of the relief ever. mikulski said the response was seen as a disaster itself. they said they would fix it then came hurricane katrina and nobles to thousand people died. fema often got in the way
mcantile exchange when katrina came along and i saw prices explode and that was really tough. could we see something like that again? >> just like everybody has been saying at least all the forecasters, we haven't seen a storm run this pattern this late, this expected path. it will be very interesting to see what plays out. how much damage there is. the storm may come in during high tide. we'll have to see what the implications are. we'll beatching the refineries specifically. melissa: yeah. >> what damage happens. i certaiy don't expect that we'll see the implications we did with hurricane katrina because, quite frankly the east coast is not the refining mecca. it is not the oil producing mea that the gulf was but there certainly could still bempacts nonetheless. melissa: here is what i care about. i'm driving home from work today. should i fillp today? should it get worse over the weekend? should i wait until next week? what is my play here? >> well, you know, playing it before the storm comes would be wise. not necessarily going to be a huge increase in price. in fact if everybody goes
think the good news unlike katrina, this will be more of a localized event. we lost billion two million barrels a day of refining capacity along the east coast. but, that's going to be offset right now but a drop in demand, a little bit more than that. so the good news is philadelphia, the largest refinery, that is the old sunoco facility, looks like minimal damage there it produces about a third of all refined products along the east coast. so that is looking pretty good but as you mentioned a couple others have storm damage and they have some flooding. it will be about a week before we know for sure. melissa: what about the drop in demand? you might read that as good news because we're not fighting over that supply. that is taking something out of the economy. and a lot of people filled up right before the storm started, so there's kind of a decline in demand as a result of that as well. >> right. melissa: is there an economic impact to the fact that people aren't driving? >> well there is. there is an economic impact. i mean this storm's economic impact will be measured in more ways
was chris back in the bush years when hurricane katrina happened? apparently, that has no impact on natural thing. it is all the president's fault back then and now it is not. >> no, how you respond to it that determines whether it is the president's fault. melissa: we've got to go. >> we'll see about that. thanks. melissa: thanks to both for coming on. appreciate your time. refusing to close for superstorm sandy has some businesses thriving. how serving up clients has never paid so well for the owner of one manhattan restaurant. we had to find a silver lining. at the end of the day it is all about money. ♪ follow the wings. melissa: as sandy was ripping across new york city earlier this week most people were hunkered down, hiding out at home until it was over. most people that is but not everyone. a restaurant in manhattan chose to brave the storm and stayed open throughout the entire thing. since they were one of the only places to do so they actually made a killing. leave it to new yorkers to bank on a disaster and make it work. sirio's owner joins me now. thanks for coming on. we've b
but let's remember, president bush was criticized by both parties when he flew over katrina and didn't stop. so, i think today's show, melissa, would have been if president obama didn't offer to come here, we would be talking about why the president dissed new york, why he didn't offer to go there while he has the state wrapped up politically and doing this for political reasons. he offered to go. the mayor said, hey, we have a lot going on and we're busy and declined that. i think the mayor made a mistake. anytime a president offers to come visit on the ground i think you should take that. that is mayor bloomberg's choice. we disagree on what he did but i understand why he did it. melissa: thank goodness said the little part at the end because all of sudden you weren't on to disagree but i won you over before we start the argument, i don't put beyond the realm of possibility. you would have accepted it if you were in new york city? do you have a monitor near you? do you happen to see, can you put up the traffic again? did you happen to see what is going on? there it is. oh. >> this
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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